Growing Green Onions Like I Know What I’m Doing

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone
Looking suspiciously like a pepper plant, innit?

New onion crop disguised as a pepper plant?

I’ve just planted the equivalent of four rows of White Lisbon Bunching green onions. In the wide open space in my underutilized pepper plant’s planter. By accident.

Why on earth do I keep doing this? “WHY!?” I hear you scream. Oh wait… that’s still me.

The instructions say, and I quote:

Onion seed of both white and yellow varieties, can be sown indoors in flats, early in the spring. When the seedlings grow to 4 inches in height, they can then be carefully lifted from the flats and transplanted to their permanent places … The onion transplants should stand at least 2-3 inches apart.

Great emphasis is placed on the “care should be taken” bits. So I took great care to make sure the seeds accidentally landed inside the pot instead of outside on the coffee table.

Why? Because I am in love with the idea of having a lovely little garden of herbs and wee veggies that I can harvest whenever I need a few green onions, a handful of basil, a pinch of sage, a few jalapeños.

Little Green Onions: Grow Where You Land

However, while reaching for the soil bags, and stretching for a trowel and old spoon, my back went into spasms.

When my back cramped up and my hand raced to my lower spine, the seeds that were IN that hand went flying and landed in the pot where the pepper grows. They’re dinky and dark brown, just like the soil. It’d take me a week with a flashlight and tweezers to retrieve them all, even if I could stay bent over that long.

So, soon as I could stand upright again, I drew out a handful of peat moss and scattered it over the places where I think the seed landed. Watered with my 7-up-bottle-converted-to-watering-can device.  Tamped it down like I know what I’m doing. One quarter inch deep, just like the package says.

In frost free areas, planting should occur in the fall. It’s the desert; there’s no frost; it’s late May, and I’m still a newbie gardener with a very bad back. This should work great.

To your garden success!
Casey – the Garden Lass

 

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

Please add your thoughts